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mootaineer

What's your maximum HR?

Out of interest, what is everyone's maximum HR?

I've never properly tried to measure mine but I've seen my HRM max-out at 175 only...never seen it go higher.
I'm only 30 though (and I know that 220-age isn't meant to be very accurate) but I wonder if I'm a plodder rather than a racer?
Having said that I seem to spend most of my time off the bike through injury.

My resting heart rate has gone as low as 43, which isn't that bad I suppose.

The tractor of the cycling world...
Slapshot

I have been up to 198!!!!! and as low as 48 in rest, but I have to say that when I saw 198 I did get a bit scared!
tiggertoo

My max rate is 150. I have never been able to get it any higher than that. Resting is in the 40's.

I understand the relationship between lung capacity and the ability of a stong pumping heart to get oxygen rich blood around to the muscles to improve performance - but I'm not sure of the benefits of a faster beating heart.

In any case, whilst it is possible to improve lung capacity, I don't think there is anything you can do to speed up the heart once you have reached your optimal level.

Any other thoughts on this?
Lucy_Aspenwind

I have no idea what my max HR is, I don't train by HR.

Also bear in mind that whatever maximum you achieve is going to be relative to the sport. Your max HR while running is typically going to be several beats higher than your max HR while cycling - the body is using more muscles while running, one reason for the differential.
Lucy_Aspenwind

tiggertoo wrote:
My max rate is 150. I have never been able to get it any higher than that. Resting is in the 40's.

I understand the relationship between lung capacity and the ability of a stong pumping heart to get oxygen rich blood around to the muscles to improve performance - but I'm not sure of the benefits of a faster beating heart.

In any case, whilst it is possible to improve lung capacity, I don't think there is anything you can do to speed up the heart once you have reached your optimal level.

Any other thoughts on this?


HR - what you see on a HRM - is only one aspect and it is cardiac output that is a better measure (CO being the product of stroke volume and heart rate). Measuring cardiac output would be a very invasive process!

I'd worry about making more power and not concern myself with HR.
mootaineer

Too true about power output Lucy...unfortunately power output monitors are generally loads more expensive than HRMs and a lot of them get stuck to one bike (or a back wheel).

Being a hobby and not racing for a living...I can't really justify it!

I see hearts like engines. The faster it beats the more blood it should be able to pump but if you're in the wrong gear (ie say my legs are weaker than yours) then a faster revving engine doesn't necessarily translate into more power or speed.

Still...I was interested in seeing what people's max HRs were.
I read about a page out of a HRM training guide once when I was waiting for someone at a bookshop. Apparently the way to monitor max HR is to go so "all out" that you're almost seeing stars.

If anyone seems a guy passed out still stuck to his cleats... Wink
Lucy_Aspenwind

A little tidbit for you....when producing the same power (it must be the SAME power output - that is key), you will generally find your HR is lower in a slower cadence than a faster one. Try it....ride the same hill in say at 50-90-70-110 cadence (mix up the order) and watch your HRM. The caveat of course, is you may find yourself fatigued sooner in a slow cadence vs. a faster one.

I understand what you mean about the cost of a PM vs a HRM. Definitely it plays a part in one's decision.

I'll say this though, PM's are becoming much more affordable ( i have a powertap pro), and with the advent of some devices that are like PM's (such as the iBike which sells for ~$400 USD) - i think it is getting more accessible. PM's are IMO, the thing of the future.

I think training with a HRM is obviously better than nothing and I used mine with devotion for a long time. It is also much simpler in a sense of analysis and such - at a glance anyway. Plus, obviously people raced and rode at very high levels before the advent of PM's (and HRM's for that matter).

Breaking down my power files does take some time but it yields me endless amounts of information on my performance, etc. I've found that it has made my progress much more linear, direct, and fast. Racing with one also tells me a bundle about my performance and where I need to improve etc.
berck

My max I've ever seen is 196. I could tell that I had got it high. I was in a sprint with some traffic, and I wanted to get out of it fast. I use 185 as my max and 176 as my 95% treshold. I can comfortably climb and strenous hill at 180-182 for 30 minutes. I normally try to keep it under 176 though, so I won't burn myself for the rest of the ride.

My lowest resting HR I've seen is 48. Pretty typical for me to be between 48 and 54.
headwind

max 186
rhr mid-upper 50s

Im hr training now and its been effective. would like to power train, which those Im involved with prefer, but its not in the cards these days.

hw
bbnaz

I won a hrm from Sigma last year at Interbike. It is still sitting on the counter in my kitchen. Not really sure how to use it and the instructions are a bit daunting. I guess if my heart keeps beating I should be okay. I do know that my resting heartrate is in the low 50s (was a swimmer early on in life).


Hubby won an Ibike computer and when he did a 125 mile brevet yesterday it calculated that he had burned over 5000 calories. How the hell could it know that? Shocked
CapeRoadie

HR max as high as 210 last summer at age 45. I must have been near death, or my Polar was f**ked up.
Jamez Samuelez

being 16 i regually train between 160-180, once i had 204, for about a second, before falling off the bike......
Morstar

CapeRoadie wrote:
HR max as high as 210 last summer at age 45. I must have been near death, or my Polar was f**ked up.


I topped out around that level about 16 years ago in the lab doing a VO2 Max test. Wouldn't fancy hitting those sort of numbers out and about though! Never had a super low resting heart rate like the 40's that some people are quoting. So yes mine can go freakily high but also doesn't rest as low as some.

Anybody know their VO2 max. Mine is 59 which is reasonably fit but nothing spectacular.

Also interested about the point somebody mentions about improving Lung capacity. Any further info on that.
mootaineer

These people with 200+ rates...do you have 4 valves in your hearts or something? Razz

The only time I've seen 200+ is when my HRM registered 225...but I know that was an iffy reading...

For my resting HR I measured it while I was laying in bed.
I think it also depends on how well you are though so a slight cold and it's up in the high 60's...
Jamez Samuelez

and even if you are slightly stressed, your HR goes up a little, its why is some surgerys they record your HR just slightly lower than what the meter reads

i guess thats why you did it in bed?
mootaineer

I heard from a friend of mine that the best way of measuring resting HR is to do it first thing in the morning while you're in bed...so no reason other than that!
I've since found that even if it's not first thing in the morning, if I lie down and relax, my HR goes down to the low 40s.

Today I recorded my highest HR while climbing a hill on the way back home...178!!
I still felt I could have given more, though with the conditions (dark, traffic, etc) I didn't want to try.
tonton_tapis

Max of 192bpm in a rowing machine competition
Max of 186bpm on a bike (hanging onto the back of a group on a long hill on a MTB ride)
Resting HR varies from 48 to 55bpm
Age 42
Find that HR varies with sport being performed. It is hard to push past 130-140 when canoeing. Is supposed to be a function of number of muscle groups being used.
In competitions my HR seems to have no bearing on perceived effort. It always goes to 170bpm plus. So much for trying to ride at a pre-defined HR.
Lucy_Aspenwind

HR is just a number, nothing more. It indicates what one cycle of your heart beat is doing, not even the entire picture (like stroke volume).

I wouldn't worry about HR - it is heavily influenced by altitude, hydration, genetics, even how well you slept the night before. It is also well understood that HR drifts with increasing time in a workout, even if you are training at a perfectly steady state.

For example, this morning on the trainer I did two intervals of 20 minutes @ 200 watts - my HR ranged from 151-171, yet during the entire time, the power I was producing was very steady @ 200 watts. Also for instance, my HR is consistently 5-10 bpm higher indoors on the trainer than outdoors, even though, power, again is the same.

Worry about the power you can produce at a given level - that's an infinitely more precise measure for 99.9% of riding.

It is irrelevant if you can ride at 200 bpm for 2 hours - what matters is how much power you are making and how it compares with your competitors!

Don't have a power meter? Then I'd recommend training by perceived exertion well before I would suggest a HRM....
mootaineer

...but Lucy I'm always exerting myself when I'm on my bike!

Seriously...I do find that if I keep about 5 bpm below my top (so far recorded) HR I can recover reasonably quickly if I need to. If I'm any closer to my mHR then I'm frazzled.

Anyway maybe this is a moot point since this is just on my commute to/from work!
I find it much harder during the weekends where we often go on routes and hills that I'm not as familiar with...and this is when my HRM seems to be most useful in helping to conserve me...

Power output would definitely be nice, yes.
By the way, anyone heard of or used one of these?
Are they any good?
http://www.ibikesports.com/
Lucy_Aspenwind

Moot - I think HR can be somewhat useful for say, endurance type training. In such cases your heart rate will provide a reasonable estimate of the work you are doing.

Anything more intense than that and heart rate becomes wildly inaccurate.

About the ibike...I'm very familiar with it and considered buying one. It works by basically estimating power based on a number of parameters you feed it....such as your weight, what riding position you are on (drops, hoods, etc). There are a few big caveats you'll want to consider.

a) the unit works best on steady climbs because the resistance is far more constant and wind/drag becomes far less.

b) it has well-documented problems in variable terrain

c) it tends to have drop-outs (read 0) on roads that are rough

I would choose riding on an indoor trainer w/a built-in power computer before I'd buy an iBike. However, I'd train with the iBike before a HRM! Smile
bbnaz

Hubby won one of those at Interbike this year. He has put it on his bike but cannot download the info to the computer. He thinks that the drivers are bad so cannot assess all of the information that is supposed to come with the unit.

When he gets back from Honduras he plans to tweak it to see if he can get it to function properly, will update as he does.
mootaineer

Thanks Lucy.
I wonder what sort of prices I could buy an iBike in the US?
I'm headed to Seattle in November. Would it be worth waiting til I get there or should I not bother and just buy it online?

Between say a Polar device (S725, etc) and an iBike, which would you get?
The iBike seems much easier to transfer between bikes to me...which already gives it a headstart in my book.
The problems with rough terrain that I've also read about hopefully won't be such a turn off either as I'd be using it while I'm riding my roadbike...

bbnaz...thanks for that too. Please let me know if your husband finds success. I don't think I'm too bothered about downloading information to my computer - though it would be a bonus if it's working.

Thank you both! Very Happy
bbnaz

I should clarify that what the ibike did to begin with (sans downloading to computer) had my hubby quite happy. I am still trying to figure out how it "knew" how many calories he had burned on a 125mile ride............
Lucy_Aspenwind

mootaineer wrote:
Thanks Lucy.
I wonder what sort of prices I could buy an iBike in the US?
I'm headed to Seattle in November. Would it be worth waiting til I get there or should I not bother and just buy it online?


Online price is typically $399 USD for the iBike unit. Oftentimes some of the vendors may have a discount coupon which would bring down the price a bit. I suspect online is the best venue, in terms of price.



mootaineer wrote:
Between say a Polar device (S725, etc) and an iBike, which would you get?
The iBike seems much easier to transfer between bikes to me...which already gives it a headstart in my book.
The problems with rough terrain that I've also read about hopefully won't be such a turn off either as I'd be using it while I'm riding my roadbike...


If I had to choose between the iBike and the Polar, I'd pick the latter. It is a real power meter, if not as consistent as some of the others. Just remember that to use the polar you have to buy their computer also - which brings the price of the system to upwards of $700 USD ( vs $400 for the iBike). The Polar works by using chain tension, which unfortunately makes it poor on an indoor trainer - also installation is very tricky and many people get it wrong. If you can deal with that and get it right - the Polar is a real PM and going to be much more useful than the iBike. Keep in mind that for $1000 you can get a newly built rear wheel with a Powertap on it (which is what I did).

Here is a study published that compares the various PM's in terms of accuracy:

http://mywebpage.netscape.com/rechung/wattage/rosetta/rosetta.html



mootaineer wrote:
bbnaz...thanks for that too. Please let me know if your husband finds success. I don't think I'm too bothered about downloading information to my computer - though it would be a bonus if it's working.

Thank you both! Very Happy


iBike file downloads are supported in cyclingpeaks WKO which is the software I use to analyze my power files.

bbanz - your husband gets the 'calories used/burned' number, because the iBike calculates the work he did on the ride in KJ. 4 KJ is equal to roughly 1 Calorie, but the human body is not 100% efficient either - so when you look at typical human efficiency on a bike - about 20-25%, the work done in KJ, is a very good estimate of Calories used.
bbnaz

okey dokey. I will trust your explanation. I know it just made me hungry to see the 5000+ number of calories used. But then I am built for comfort not speed........
mayofan

180 on a treadmill in a seriously hot gym is the only time ive measured it....i suspect ive been higher though...when you can fell it pounding in your stomach and your ears begin to hurt...not a nice feeling!!
surprisingly ive never puked depite some seriously horrible sessions...any reason for this beyond having a good stomach?????
westloopkestrel

Highest ever for me was 205, but that was a decade ago.

I think I hit higher than that during a mtb race, but that's just because my heart was so beating so fast and hard I passed out....while still riding. I woke up on my back, still clipped into both pedals. Got up and finished (only another 1/2 mile) and could barely turn the pedals. I learned I lost 10 positions while on my back but didn't see a single rider pass me.

Still, these days (10 years later), I still exercise in the high 180's. Tipping over 190 still happens but I don't stay there too long before my body forces me to slow down.
mootaineer

After a layoff of just over a month and plenty indulgence during that time...

...my new maxHR is now 185!

Unfortunately it didn't translate into performance. My motivation is high but so now is my centre of gravity... Shocked
So it definitely looks like I didn't need to use the extra HR in the past (or that I still had some in reserve. I'll have to adjust my training).

Had a great time though. Ate lots while I was in Seattle/Vancouver.
You can't go wrong eating a full meal rounding off with a Cheesecakefactory dessert!

My rides since my first one back post holidays are now easier.
I've also been on a run recently and was alarmed at how easy it was to raise my HR compared to cycling. I suppose it didn't help that it was also my first run for over 1.5yrs after suffering from back problems...
trirob

i havnt used a hrm in about a year..... but back then my max heart rate when running was 206 (although i am 20 so its not incredibly high). I recently estimated my HR to be 200 in the pool though (that was after a 200 metres max effort)
thunderthighs

its not about rate, its about rate recovery, how fast can you go and how long can u stay there..
smarauder68

I've had mine up to 180 but never tried to push it more....resting rate is 48 before coffee in the morning...Smile
thunderthighs

so !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

mean shit....

recovery..recovery.. lactate too .. ciao

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