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MerlinGuy

Tell us your interesting ride stories

I thought I would share with you a few of the interesting things that have happened while I was out riding my bike

- Once, while riding through the Air Force Academy, I spotted a fully saddled but riderless horse trot out of the woods.  A hiker near by tried to grab its reins but his barking dog scared the horse which then galloped out on the road.  I kicked it in, biked up next to the horse, grabbed its reins, brought it to a halt.  I walked it back to the hiker who (having put his dog in his car) said he would wait around to see if anyone came along to claim the equine.

- Another time while riding through USAFA I came bombing down a long hill which went right past a field containing a herd of mule deer.  Just as I approached the herd they decided they preferred to be on the other side of the road and ran across the highway right in front of me.  I luckily split the herd between the 5th and 6th deer.  I still get the willies if I see a herd of deer while riding my bike.

- While riding out in the country, I once came up on a herd of cattle.  I guess I spooked a calf because it jumped up and started running along the fence.  Immediately its mother started after the calf.  Soon all the rest of the cattle joined in and there I was riding down the road on one side of a fence while a whole herd of cattle ran along on the other side.  It reminded me of a scene out of "American Flyer'
last km

Was doing some pre season training in Belgium a few years back with some club mates and we had a horse initially running along side us in its paddock, then decided it would be more fun to join us on the road so it jumped over the fence, we just about s**t ourselves , but it outsprinted us all and disapeared down a track and left us in peace phew, we had a good laugh (and a few beers) about it later.............. Shocked
bbnaz

This came from a friend trimaui (from that other board).  It was an amazing story and fits right in with this theme:

An explanation for my absence written to my team from my riding mate the morning of May 10th.

"At 830am this morning Jon and I were nearing the end of a nice early ride. We had just climbed the Knights Valley side of Franz Valley Road . A quick stop and the top to admire the view and we started the decent to Porter Creek . Jon rolled out right in front of me and was about 20m ahead. As we came around a right hander near the top at only about 25-30mph, we startled a deer standing in the ditch on the right hand side of the road. It was the kind of thing you just know canít be good. The deer jumped and looked at us, then froze. Jon hit the brakes and looked to be good to go by on the left. The deer had other ideas and immediately jumped out right in front of Jon as it attempted to get across the road. They collided right in the middle of the road with the deer completely taking out the font end of Jonís new Land Shark. Jon went over the falls and landed directly on his head and secondarily on the left shoulder. As his limp body slid and rolled to a stop I was thinking this was going to be really bad. When I came to stop and ran back to him, he wasnít moving and body was contorted in a way that definitely wasnít natural. Jon was out cold, eyes rolled back and breathing erratically. A quick check for major issues revealed a pretty good head wound that was bleeding, lotís of damage the kit on the left shoulder and arm, and a deep cut on the left knee cap but no other severe trauma or bones sticking out. I immediately regretted accidentally leaving my cell phone at home, and began to think we might be fíd out in the middle of nowhere when something that sounded like a cross between a llama spitting and voice tracks from Jabba the Hut started coming out of his mouth. I dug through his pockets and grabbed his cell phone praying for reception. Man, that phone took a long time to power up and get a signal. While 911 had paramedics on the way, Jon started to come around and we got the bleeding stopped. RV Fire (Larkfield) and SLS were there within about 10mins and by then he had started putting things together, although he asked me if he hit a deer about 15 times. They took him to Memorial where heís recovering and spending the better park of the week for observation. The tally: stitches in the head, broken nose, staples in the knee, staples in both hands, broken fingers, cracked knuckles, possible broken clavicle, many broken ribs, and some pretty impressive road rash, but heís all there and he's going to be ok. The new Shark actually faired pretty good: the carbon frame appeared in tact but nearly every spoke in the front wheel broke, handle bars spun around backward and the head was loose but not broken, rear wheel pretty wavy, and the rear derailleur was hammered. The deer: pranced off down the slope."
CapeRoadie

I was excited and anxious to start the racing season this year because I felt that I had put in a lot more hard training on the bike over the winter than ever before.  I was very fortunate to do a trade with a pro rider who decided he would trade chiropractic-PT treatment in exchange for coaching me.  I started with him last December and trained hard for 3 months in the dead of a Cape Cod winter, putting in a lot of miles on the trainer and many more out in the sub-freezing temps.  After a decent performance in a crit in Santa Rosa in February on vacation, I was ready to test my legs against a group of riders I had come to know well over the past 1 1/2 years locally here in New England.  

They run an early series of practice races at a state park in Plymouth, Massachusetts (Myles Standish State Forest, Charge Pond--KRE raced there and knows it well) and I was really looking forward to being competitive.

When we arrived for that first race in early March (about an hour early), it was pouring rain.  Like, sheets of rain.  It was also very dark, that kind of dark you not only see but feel, as if something really bad may happen at any moment.  It was raw and cold, in the low 40's.  It felt even colder with the wind.  A very harsh northeast wind, the kind they write about around here.  It made the the dense stand of pines surrounding the course bow to its steady rhythm with every beating gust.  

My racing buddy, Ben,  a guy who would never train if it was raining, decided to go, and I couldn't believe that decision given his history with rain.  But he was as eager as I to test the legs, having worked harder training with me than he had ever worked on a bike.  We went out for an hour warm-up, to see the course (we'd never seen it before) and to do a few practice sprints.  

There were 5-6 puddles that spanned the width of the course road, at the bottom of most of the downhills.  The drainage was very poor, and attempts by the race director to clear the drains in that hour before the race were futile. The rain was relentless, and falling sideways like little bullets.  The puddles were 2-3 feet deep!  We slowed before each huge puddle to make sure we wouldn't disappear into it, but we were pretty certain that during the race there would be no such luxury.  No slowing in a race, would there be?  Even in this storm?  That stiff northeast wind pelted the rain at us, especially on the back side near the finishing stretch, where the tall pines opened up to let in views of the dark sky.

After mulling over what would be the best thing to wear, I opted for a Gore-Tex shell and neoprene shoe covers ( the only shoe covers I owned at the time).  No question:  we were going to get drenched.  But this race redefined what getting wet in a bike race really meant!  There were only about 15-20 starters (most riders were WAY too smart to ever show up for this soakfest)., and after the first puddle it was clear that no one was slowing down for puddles; this was a race!  Question answered.  

Fuck!  Every time the group hit one of the puddles, the amount of water that was kicked up into my face was unbelievable!  I was literally inhaling water, choking on it, then coughing it up, 5-6 puddles per lap.  The circuit loop was about a mile or so (I forget), and so that meant 5-6 drenchings per lap, with maybe 15 laps expected for this race.  I did the math in my head after the first lap.  "I'll choke at least 75 times during this race", I thought to myself.  "This is a high quality race", I joked to myself (to relieve some tension).  The humor was quickly washed away.

Forget about drafting!  That just meant more water inhalation and choking!  The northeast winds were especially brutal, but it was a better option to face them than the mouthful of muddy puddle and shite kicked up from the rider in front of you.  Better to lead than to swallow that shite!  It sucked, truly.  Many riders simply dropped out because they had enough sense to.  the rest of us, idiots all, had no business being there.  Why would anyone do this just to win a race?  Ben and I did not come to our senses.  We finished the damn thing, but it took us a long time to stop shivering.  He said he couldn't stop shivering even after he had been in the car for an hour and was warm and dry.

As we drove out of the park after the race, we definitely felt the temps drop.  It started to sleet, then snow.  Our race, the "B" race barely made it.  They cancelled the following race, the "A" race, due to inclement weather.  I wished that our race had been cancelled before it even began.  Myles Standish State Park got several inches of snow that day as we headed back to Cape Cod.  As I drove out of Plymouth with Ben, all I could think about was how life must have truly sucked for the Mayflower Pilgrims during their first winter here.  Their descendants survived though (my children and wife are descended from them), thanks to the Native Americans.  But look what the natives got in the end:  war, removal from their land, and smallpox.  Maybe the Pilgrims had it easy after all.  I pondered these thoughts a while during the snowy drive home, glad that the shivering had finally stopped, and glad that I would probably never race in conditions like those ever again.
last km

Capes post reminds me when I rode the Tom Simpson memorial race in Harworth Toms home place. It chucked it down the whole race and lots of standing water, it was like standing under a cold shower for the 2.5 hrs of the race.

The race finishes slightly uphill and I was going well in the sprint and was sure of a place in my age category, so as I went over the line I shouted my number (like you do in the UK at the end of a timetrial).
Guess what, the judges didnt either see me or hear me, boy was I p****d off that day †Rolling Eyes
bbnaz

CapeRoadie wrote:


thanks to the Native Americans. †But look what the natives got in the end: †war, removal from their land, and smallpox. †Maybe the Pilgrims had it easy after all. †I pondered these thoughts a while during the snowy drive home, glad that the shivering had finally stopped, and glad that I would probably never race in conditions like those ever again.


for some reason that term really annoys the crap out of me.  Maybe because of all of the Indians I have been around out here in the southwest don't care for it, preferring to use their tribal names and/or indigenous people.  They always felt that "Native American" conjured up a european term and not how they wanted to be identified.


besides, they came from elsewhere too, they just got here before those white guys.........

history shows that life ain't fair and that shameful behaviour takes place continually.



rant over
cardinal guzman

Nice story Cape! Nemo

Reminds me of when I was riding to work one day after a thunderstorm deluge. I turned off the main road right into a lake that went across the road. Travelling at some speed, I was in the big ring and slowly ground to a halt as the water rose above my bottom bracket. Luckily It was in the days of toestraps so I was able to get my feet out easily, but it didn't improve my mood any, spending the following 25 hour shift with soggy feet. That's Manchester for you - bloody weather!
CapeRoadie

bbnaz wrote:
CapeRoadie wrote:


thanks to the Native Americans.  But look what the natives got in the end:  war, removal from their land, and smallpox.  Maybe the Pilgrims had it easy after all.  I pondered these thoughts a while during the snowy drive home, glad that the shivering had finally stopped, and glad that I would probably never race in conditions like those ever again.


for some reason that term really annoys the crap out of me.  Maybe because of all of the Indians I have been around out here in the southwest don't care for it, preferring to use their tribal names and/or indigenous people.  They always felt that "Native American" conjured up a european term and not how they wanted to be identified.


besides, they came from elsewhere too, they just got here before those white guys.........

history shows that life ain't fair and that shameful behaviour takes place continually.



rant over


Well, shit, Columbus thought he was in India, and therefore we got the "West Indies" and "Indians".  If that doesn't conjure up a European term I don't know what does.  The Native Americans where I live prefer that to being called "Indian", but would also prefer to be known first as Wampanoag, so I get that.  Remember we also went from "colored people" to "Negroes" and its variants to "Black" people to "African-Americans" and back to "people of color".  Now, stop ranting, you Cracker.  Laughing
chardon

found the way back...
last km

This thread seems to have lost its way
chardon

last km wrote:
This thread seems to have lost its way


Sorry... detouring it back to cycling routes.  Wink  Wink  Wink
mr shifter

bbnaz wrote:
CapeRoadie wrote:


thanks to the Native Americans. †.


for some reason that term really annoys the crap out of me. †Maybe because of all of the Indians I have been around out here in the southwest don't care for it, preferring to use their tribal names and/or indigenous people. †They always felt that "Native American" conjured up a european term and not how they wanted to be identified.


besides, they came from elsewhere too, they just got here before those white guys.........


Sorry km

Couple of years ago in a bar/restaurant in Chicago and the waitress comments on my accent, so I ask from where her family came from.

From a US State she informed me and I put my foot in it with "Ah an Indian" and she was not best pleased and proceeded to explain that she is a "Native American".
I had to stop her lecture about "Indians" and that I am very familiar with who they are, back home and that over at Niagara Falls there is a signpost to the "Indian Village" but across the road is a couple of Indian Takeaways.  This had amused me at the time.

When she returned with my beer I apologised and said that my only excuse would be the "Hollywood Films" that had twisted her nations history and my countries history also.

Interesting ride maybe not, but it sticks in my mind.

I must have been 21 at the time because I came out of my engineering apprentiship as a Universal miller and a guy went sick for 4/5 months.
They asked me to take over this bloody great milling machine that needed the overhead cranes to put work on the table.
I passed out (of my apprentiship) and became a man ??? and now earned proper wages, so Saturday (time and half) and Sunday (double time) was good money.

Sunday, clock on as usual at 07.30 and work till 12.00 is 9 hours pay and then home for mum's lunch and out on the bike about 12.45 on my own of course.

Rode down the Portsmouth Road (intention of Guildford/Godalming) but carried on up the dreaded Devil's Punchbowl climb to Hindhead and just rode on to Portsmouth. (well I allways carried money for a rail fare)
Then left to Chichester and on to the Littlehampton/London road and up and over Bury Hill to Horsham, Crawley, Redhill, Croydon and a big struggle over Streatham Hill but downhill to home.

160/170 miles for an afternoon/evening ride and I'm still pleased with it.
I did it again another time but as a long day ride.

Be Lucky
thunderthighs

beat marc madiot in a senoir crit in frnace i was a junoir..yes. was a low key race.. but i beat him..thats my 15 min of fame.... place 4...him 7 or do..

dajambline dayuporov won.. that 80 rider..busted twice..that guy ...

ciao
CapeRoadie

thunderthighs wrote:
beat marc madiot in a senoir crit in frnace i was a junoir..yes. was a low key race.. but i beat him..thats my 15 min of fame.... place 4...him 7 or do..

dajambline dayuporov won.. that 80 rider..busted twice..that guy ...

ciao


Did you mean Djamolidine Abdoujaparov, the "Tashkent Terror", the infamous "Abdou", the winner of the Green Jersey three times at le Tour in 1991, 1993 and 1994, won?  Did he elbow you in the face on the way to victory that day, TT?

What year was that, TT?
Ralphnorman

I was out training going up a slight rise a few miles from home and heard a rumbling coming from behind me. Thinking it was a truck/lorry I moved over as far as I could to let it past. Got up to the top of the rise and a roundabout and what happened to come past me? A tank with a gunner on the top. Guy on the turret was looking round, it would have been interesting if he had swung the gun round to face me Rolling Eyes  Wink
last km

Nice one Ralph. I used to live at the top of a 1 in 8 hill and always had a big do or die effort to finish off my training.

One particular night as I was giving it some bick licks I glanced over my shoulder and I could see this elderly guy gaining on me on what appeared an old "sit up and beg"position bike and pedalling slowly.

I dug in really deep as I approached my house and as I pulled over into my driveway he went passed on an electric powered bike !


The b*****d  Laughing
mr shifter

Anybody here remember the NCU-BLRC days, well I started in the NCU at that time and the NCU clubs were affliated to the "Road Time Trials Council" but the "League" could not.

The NCU did all types of racing ie Track, Cyclo X and Circuit Racing (Criteriums) mainly off road on motor car circuits and Aerodromes. The Isle of Wight "Easter Weekend" was a chance to race on real roads and I never rode the Isle of Man races.

The "Cape" post brought back memories of Stapleford Tawney, ESSEX Aerodrome of eating dirty water and trying to hold a front or side position when the wind and rain came from the North East across the flatlands.
The best I ever did there was a 5th and a 6th from 4 races as I never got the right position at the sharp corner about 150/200 yds from the line.
I tried the inside (baulked) and was on Ron Sefton's (34th Nomads) wheel coming into the outside of the corner when he won in stormy weather.
Yea-yea I now know that I should have passed him just before the brakes went on for the corner.

I know "Tanks" are fearsome things up close and out at Bagshot riding on Bridle Paths (public right of way) on MOD land and you hear them coming hopefully at the designated Xing and then 3 or 4 of them thunder past at full speed.
Similar to standing at a Rail Xing and an Express Steam Tain passes and at least he is on tracks so you know where he is expected to run.

Be Lucky
MerlinGuy

For those of you who didn't have the patience to read all of Cape Roadie's story here is the Reader's Digest abridged version.

Cape Roadie once road a race and the weather was shit.

Wink
berck

I was out doing one of my training routes during lunch. I went over a small rise and a midsize SUV passed me (I was on the shoulder with plenty of room). The vehicles breaks and slows wanting me to come along side. I wasn't sure what to make of it at first. As I was approaching the vehicle, the passenger window rolls down. Then the following took place

Driver: (ineligible words)
Me: What?
Driver: Are you Dutch?
Me: No
Driver: pointing at me going up and down as to imply my riding attire
Me: Oh, its bright and stands out, but my heritage is from Belgium
Driver: Oh, neighbors. I'm Dutch.

She then drove off. I was wearing Rabbobank attire.

I then went on to post my fastest time up a hill climb about 15 minutes later and my fastest time for the ride too.
thunderthighs

CapeRoadie wrote:
thunderthighs wrote:
beat marc madiot in a senoir crit in frnace i was a junoir..yes. was a low key race.. but i beat him..thats my 15 min of fame.... place 4...him 7 or do..

dajambline dayuporov won.. that 80 rider..busted twice..that guy ...

ciao


Did you mean Djamolidine Abdoujaparov, the "Tashkent Terror", the infamous "Abdou", the winner of the Green Jersey three times at le Tour in 1991, 1993 and 1994, won? †Did he elbow you in the face on the way to victory that day, TT?

What year was that, TT?


1983.. was a pretty fasty ride..
ciao
Bartali

Good man TT - that's a serious scalp!
Ralphnorman

were you skitching, berck? Rolling Eyes  Wink
Ralphnorman

this is't one of mine, it's a friends.....
she was riding the Etape Caledonia and the roads were closed for the route. There were obviously several people upset by this Rolling Eyes There was a little old lady standing just outside her door with a sign that read "no paper, no church". This road is closed for about 3 hours every year so this race can come and give a boost to the local economy etc So my friend was in a right mind to stop and shout to her "I agree with you! Get rid of them both!"
cardinal guzman

After watching that stupendous tennis match last night, Mrs G went out into the garden. She came back in with the most emaciated young little cat you've ever seen. This cat is absolutely knackered, it can hardly walk, it's eyes are glued up, it can't eat, just drink water with a bit of milk in it and go "meep". I stayed up all night with it on my lap, giving it a drink when it would/could and occasionally  plonking it in an improvised litter tray.

This morning I stuck my bike in the back of mrs G's car and got a lift with cat to the RSPCA in Halifax on her way to work. After leaving the cat and our details, I wended my now incredibly weary way home in the sunshine and as I was going through Hebden I passed a team GB lady rider coming the other way. I let on, but got a thousand yard stare back for my trouble - she must have been too stunned by my incredible good looks to move. That or I was hallucinating with fatigue, I mean, team gb are all lovely and impeccable role models aren't they?!  Shocked  Wink
redster73

cardinal guzman wrote:
After watching that stupendous tennis match last night, Mrs G went out into the garden. She came back in with the most emaciated young little cat you've ever seen. This cat is absolutely knackered, it can hardly walk, it's eyes are glued up, it can't eat, just drink water with a bit of milk in it and go "meep". I stayed up all night with it on my lap, giving it a drink when it would/could and occasionally †plonking it in an improvised litter tray.

This morning I stuck my bike in the back of mrs G's car and got a lift with cat to the RSPCA in Halifax on her way to work. After leaving the cat and our details, I wended my now incredibly weary way home in the sunshine and as I was going through Hebden I passed a team GB lady rider coming the other way. I let on, but got a thousand yard stare back for my trouble - she must have been too stunned by my incredible good looks to move. That or I was hallucinating with fatigue, I mean, team gb are all lovely and impeccable role models aren't they?! †ShockedWink


Did she wear the orange of a well known bike shop?
cardinal guzman

redster73 wrote:
Did she wear the orange of a well known bike shop?


Nah, full union jack skinsuit.
redster73

cardinal guzman wrote:
redster73 wrote:
Did she wear the orange of a well known bike shop?


Nah, full union jack skinsuit.


Not Ms Cooke then...just a very focused individual!
grrr

I once ran over a pigeon and it made a strangely pleasing 'pop' sound

apologies to animal lovers, but has anyone ever killed anything bigger?
cardinal guzman

I've had a pigeon explode off the windscreen. My brother's done a springbok and my dad once ran over me.
grrr

cardinal guzman wrote:
I've had a pigeon explode off the windscreen. My brother's done a springbok and my dad once ran over me.


presumably not on a bike, though!
cardinal guzman

No, they were all vehicular incidents. Biggest thing I've run over is a slug - followed by a bumblebee maybe. Wonder why bees lie in the road in summer?
grrr

cardinal guzman wrote:
No, they were all vehicular incidents. Biggest thing I've run over is a slug - followed by a bumblebee maybe. Wonder why bees lie in the road in summer?


because you keep running them over I imagine!
redster73

I always have this fear that I'll pass roadkill at the same time as a car coming the otherway...
cardinal guzman

http://news.aol.co.uk/bees-buzz-o...rash/article/20080630133509990007

All they need to do, is put the queens back in the hives and the bees will follow by themselves. Like finding a queen in 12 million bees! 'No that's a drone, and that's a drone, and that's a drone, drone, drone, ooh what's tha - drone, drone, that's a drone and that's a drone.........."
forza_petacchi

I ran over a chipmunk a few weeks ago...Sad
berck

Ralphnorman wrote:
were you skitching, berck? Rolling EyesWink


No Very Happy. Only my kids are dumb enough to try it.

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