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sheeponabike

Sizing modern frames

In the old days of horizontal top tubes a frame size was simply the measurement from the centre of the bottom bracket spindle to the top of the down tube. My present bike is size 56 and I've measured the distance as above, and indeed it's 56 centimeters, but it has a slightly sloping top tube which surely renders this meaningless?  Shocked
I ask, because i'm looking for a second hand steel frame and have been looking at 56 or 57 models, but aren't these going to turn out completely different to my present frame?
confused sheep  Sad

edit:
Don't bother replying - i've just had a gleg at Sheldon Brown and it's even more complicated than I thought. Chaos rules.  Shocked
headwind

yeah...bike measuring is a tad crazy and practically every company does it different.

really the thing to keep in mind is top tube length, measured center to center.  for compact grames its the VIRTUAL TT length.  Stand over height (BB to seat tube cluster) is not really critical given compact geometries, but BB to saddle height is obviously critical as ever.

hw
grrr

agree with you, Sheep.

My current ride is a huge 61cm in the traditional measurement but I chose it mainly because it has a relatively short top tube for a more upright style more suitable for my advancing years.

With a longer top tube I use a 'smaller' frame and a higher seat but just don't find it comfortable any more (christ I sound like I'm in my dotage!)

As mentioned on other threads there's no way of knowing until you set it up and ride it.  Obviously disappointing if you build it yourself and don't like it!
sheeponabike

I've measured the top tube and I've measured the seat tube as if the top tube was horizontal and not sloping, which should give a dimension corresponding with an "old fashioned" steel frame. Must be spot on too, because it comes out at 38, or 23 inches, which was my frame size in the "good old days"
So I can search for a Colnago or whatever with confidence now. Very Happy
CapeRoadie

This got me thinking of something unrelated.  You mentioned a Colnago frame, sheep, and I have always admired Colnago's work.  I was talking with my guy at the local bike shop where I have work done, and he jokes, "Yeah, they're a good product, but just try and get anything warranteed...".  One of the reasons why he doesn't sell Colnago is apparently they're difficult to work with when things go wrong, at least here in the States.  Which got me thinking.  Are they "difficult" because we're so far away, across an ocean, here in the States?  Or does Colnago not have a good warranty/guarantee on their products?  Just a question.

When we found the crack in my Trek frame, we called Wisconsin that day, took some digital photos,e-mailed them minutes later, received a call back from Trek within the half-hour, discussed the issue as likely being a "crack in the resin" but what the hell, why take a chance, we'll send you a new one and when you receive it just send us the old frame back.  Trek made the entire process so easy it was almost unbelieveable to me as a consumer here in the U.S. where most companies, of any type, really suck.

So, I was wondering if anybody had any experience with Colnago in that regard here in the States versus in Europe...
sheeponabike

I'm after steel anyway. Wink
CapeRoadie

sheeponabike wrote:
I'm after steel anyway. Wink


How light is today's steel anyway?  I still think we're going to get over our carbon fetish any year now...
cyclingtv

CapeRoadie wrote:
This got me thinking of something unrelated.  You mentioned a Colnago frame, sheep, and I have always admired Colnago's work.  I was talking with my guy at the local bike shop where I have work done, and he jokes, "Yeah, they're a good product, but just try and get anything warranteed...".  One of the reasons why he doesn't sell Colnago is apparently they're difficult to work with when things go wrong, at least here in the States.  Which got me thinking.  Are they "difficult" because we're so far away, across an ocean, here in the States?  Or does Colnago not have a good warranty/guarantee on their products?  Just a question.

When we found the crack in my Trek frame, we called Wisconsin that day, took some digital photos,e-mailed them minutes later, received a call back from Trek within the half-hour, discussed the issue as likely being a "crack in the resin" but what the hell, why take a chance, we'll send you a new one and when you receive it just send us the old frame back.  Trek made the entire process so easy it was almost unbelieveable to me as a consumer here in the U.S. where most companies, of any type, really suck.

So, I was wondering if anybody had any experience with Colnago in that regard here in the States versus in Europe...
for a major repair (not cosmetic) a friend had to have his carbon frame sent to italy..
he had crashed so he paid for the repair.. took some time.. fixed to his satisfaction..

wonder who ends up buying/getting your old frame..  Wink
CapeRoadie

I am told that a Trek employee will get my old frame at no cost.  Don't really know if that's true, of course.  I'd give it to a justcycling member if I had the choice.  We could have done a raffle or something...
bbnaz

cyclingtv wrote:
for a major repair (not cosmetic) a friend had to have his carbon frame sent to italy..
he had crashed so he paid for the repair.. took some time.. fixed to his satisfaction..

wonder who ends up buying/getting your old frame..  Wink


ask Headwind about his Fondriest debacle...........on second thought, don't.  It just might be too painful. Confused
last km

In the olden days before sloping top tubes it was inside leg measurement minus 9 inches, non of this poncy cms guff  Very Happy  Very Happy  Very Happy
sheeponabike

grrr wrote:


My current ride is a huge 61cm in the traditional measurement but I chose it mainly because it has a relatively short top tube for a more upright style more suitable for my advancing years.

With a longer top tube I use a 'smaller' frame and a higher seat but just don't find it comfortable any more (christ I sound like I'm in my dotage!)


Jesus grrr, don't get old before your time mate - you're a wee bairn compared to me!
grrr

sheeponabike wrote:
grrr wrote:


My current ride is a huge 61cm in the traditional measurement but I chose it mainly because it has a relatively short top tube for a more upright style more suitable for my advancing years.

With a longer top tube I use a 'smaller' frame and a higher seat but just don't find it comfortable any more (christ I sound like I'm in my dotage!)


Jesus grrr, don't get old before your time mate - you're a wee bairn compared to me!


My wilderness years are catching up with me, but you are right - I must pull myself together!
Bartali

CapeRoadie wrote:
This got me thinking of something unrelated.  You mentioned a Colnago frame, sheep, and I have always admired Colnago's work.  I was talking with my guy at the local bike shop where I have work done, and he jokes, "Yeah, they're a good product, but just try and get anything warranteed...".  One of the reasons why he doesn't sell Colnago is apparently they're difficult to work with when things go wrong, at least here in the States.  Which got me thinking.  Are they "difficult" because we're so far away, across an ocean, here in the States?  Or does Colnago not have a good warranty/guarantee on their products?  Just a question.

When we found the crack in my Trek frame, we called Wisconsin that day, took some digital photos,e-mailed them minutes later, received a call back from Trek within the half-hour, discussed the issue as likely being a "crack in the resin" but what the hell, why take a chance, we'll send you a new one and when you receive it just send us the old frame back.  Trek made the entire process so easy it was almost unbelieveable to me as a consumer here in the U.S. where most companies, of any type, really suck.

So, I was wondering if anybody had any experience with Colnago in that regard here in the States versus in Europe...


No problem whatsoever with Colnago warranty.  Problem is that because they don't produce frames on anything approaching the scale of Trek, they can't easily pull a new one off the shelf and send back.  Take my Colnago singlespeed - ordered early October, arrived early July!  Takes them time to build what you want in the colour you want etc.
MerlinGuy

CapeRoadie wrote:
sheeponabike wrote:
I'm after steel anyway. Wink


How light is today's steel anyway?  I still think we're going to get over our carbon fetish any year now...


Me, that's why I like my Merlin.  

Yep, 10,000 years from now, archaeologists will be digging up our remains.  Sheep's bike will just be a rust imprint in the ground.  Capie's carbon with end up as thousands of pieces in some box.  Mine, well some happy digger will probably slap a couple of new wheels and some bar tape on mine and ride it home.

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