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sabcarrera

screening for heart problems

It appears that heart problems are more common than we assume. Cycling is probably at the forefront of medical supervision and I know that cyclists undergo extensive testing including ultrasound scans on their heart to check for any deformities.
However, it's good idea to know your limits and train up slowly.


http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Hear...eNews/story?id=7192905&page=1
CapeRoadie

Re: screening for heart problems

sabcarrera wrote:
It appears that heart problems are more common than we assume. Cycling is probably at the forefront of medical supervision and I know that cyclists undergo extensive testing including ultrasound scans on their heart to check for any deformities.
However, it's good idea to know your limits and train up slowly.

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Hear...eNews/story?id=7192905&page=1


I'm not so sure this study shows that heart problems are more common than we assume.  The St. Luke's study from Kansas City found that:

Quote:
...about one-third of the college athletes showed signs of heart abnormalities. Moreover, researchers found signs of potential heart disease in about one in 10 of the athletes they screened.


In the first place,  there isn't anything in the ABC report that compares those numbers with the general population.  Further, I'm not convinced that these signs of "abnormalities" (1 in 3) and "potential heart disease" (1 in 10) equate to any real findings.  There is a problem with false negatives from ECG interpretation according to the report, and I agree with that.  It was Mr. Cherry's physical examination (not ECG) that found his particular condition (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy).  

This one study is just one study, don't forget.  I'm not convinced 10% of college athletes actually have heart disease, nor am I convinced that 1/3 have heart abnormalities.  That doesn't sound right on its surface, and I don't think an ECG is the best way to screen, in any case.  I think clinical history and physical examination are more important.  It's sometimes a very long reach from having "potential" and "signs of" something, to having actual disease.  It will be interesting to see scientific debate on the issue continue.

I'm also not sold on taking Crestor (or other statins) as a preventive approach to heart disease in healthy persons (JUPITER study), although a big study in NEJM last November proposed it.  See:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=97007885
sabcarrera

In Italy older cyclists are screened intensively if they want to compete. I don't race but had an ultrasound done. I know that ECG gives false positives and negatives. Two people I know had serious heart problems not longer after getting a clean ECG.
The trouble with cycling is that it takes your heart to the limit and beyond.
thunderthighs

[quote="sabcarrera"]In Italy older cyclists are screened intensively if they want to compete. I don't race but had an ultrasound done. I know that ECG gives false positives and negatives. Two people I know had serious heart problems not longer after getting a clean ECG.
The trouble with cycling is that it takes your heart to the limit and beyond.[/quote]...

yes it does.. many of my freinds have issues......thats scarey..ciao
CapeRoadie

sabcarrera wrote:
In Italy older cyclists are screened intensively if they want to compete. I don't race but had an ultrasound done. I know that ECG gives false positives and negatives. Two people I know had serious heart problems not longer after getting a clean ECG.
The trouble with cycling is that it takes your heart to the limit and beyond.


The more info the better, surely.  Certainly for aging racing cyclists that makes a lot of sense.
last km

My father died relatively young at 67 of a massive heart attack......Id been racing for years and when he died I decided to have a check up

Shocked I had high blood pressure.......the doctor suggested I stop racing till it was under control.......which it now is and im back racing ...any time soon......worth any one with a family history of heart problems getting a good check up......we get our cars an MOT.......do the same for your body
sabcarrera

Twelve apparently fit and healthy young people die from undiagnosed heart conditions each week in the UK

About one in every 20 cases of sudden death from an inherited heart condition is due to Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome (Sads)

Sads is where no definite cause of death can be found even after the heart has been examined by an expert pathologist

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8026860.stm
Fatboy

I use a heart rate monitor when cycling, I am 51 and get worried that sometimes when climbing my heart rate can go as high as 188.  I had a check up last summer my heart rate and blood pressure were ok. Last Saturday my avg over a 60 mile ride was 140!. I don't feel out of breath or dizzy. Has anyone else experienced a similar problem
berck

I'm only a year younger and I can typically have my HR in the 140's. For me, this is pretty normal. I feel good during the ride.

I can hit in the 180's, but I usually don't let myself do that much. A doctor friend said that you'll know when you hit your max because the HR just stops climbing. I once hit 195 about six years ago. I didn't realize I could get that high. It was unexpected, but I was riding in some traffic trying to get to a turning spot.

Your max HR is definitely a lot higher than 220 - age.
Biosphere

What type of resting heart rates do people have on here? Morning and afternoons I'm in the 50s and drop into 40s in the evening and night. One night recently I dipped below 40. I'm certainly not anywhere near being proper sporty fit so I think its probably time for a medical opinion as that seems quite low for normal population but thought I'd ask of a more focussed population.
SlowRower

My resting heart rate is generally sub 40 and often goes down to 35/36. Even when I was a lardy slob in my teens, my resting rate was still in the 40s.

I ended up in A&E last summer and got wired up to one of those monitor things. I dosed off to sleep as it was late at night and got woken up by an alarm blaring to the sight of several doctors and nurses charging in my direction. The heart machine had decided that I must be about to die, given how slowly my ticker was going by the standards of the average person in the street, and had called for backup.

I assured them I was fine and that my heart rate was so low because I'm an elite athlete. Smile They accepted that, but for some reason saw fit to do an examination of me that involved grappling my Crown Jewels rather robustly.

I discharged myself from their care as soon as I could...
Biosphere

SlowRower wrote:
. . . but for some reason saw fit to do an examination of me that involved grappling my Crown Jewels rather robustly . . .


It's an effective method of double checking someone isn't at death's door Wink
SlowRower

Biosphere wrote:
SlowRower wrote:
. . . but for some reason saw fit to do an examination of me that involved grappling my Crown Jewels rather robustly . . .


It's an effective method of double checking someone isn't at death's door Wink


I think they'd decided I was malingering and thought this the best way to free up the bed!
gerry12ie

SlowRower wrote:
Biosphere wrote:
SlowRower wrote:
. . . but for some reason saw fit to do an examination of me that involved grappling my Crown Jewels rather robustly . . .


It's an effective method of double checking someone isn't at death's door Wink


I think they'd decided I was malingering and thought this the best way to free up the bed!


In some cultures it would be read as an invitation to stay Wink
Slapshot 3

Two hundred years ago they would have put a BIG HUGE needle through yer nose...i'd rather have my nuts "boisterously" squeezed by some hot nurse anyday..Wink

Being a fat Git....I'm not telling about heart rates....bout 60 resting last max I had tested was 170...I don't use an HRM so wouldnt have a scoobies about when I'm out on the bike...
Bartali

Sat watching telly with yet another cold ... 48.
Guiness

last km wrote:
My father died relatively young at 67 of a massive heart attack......Id been racing for years and when he died I decided to have a check up

Shocked I had high blood pressure.......the doctor suggested I stop racing till it was under control.......which it now is and im back racing ...any time soon......worth any one with a family history of heart problems getting a good check up......we get our cars an MOT.......do the same for your body


Good luck mate with getting back into racing. Wise words. A friend of a friend had his heart checked out as it was beating too much. I think it was over-training that did it. Tachycardia it's called. He had an implant of some sorts to help him. And had to ease off training too. He was putting too much stress on his heart with all the training. And his wife had just left him. That didn't help. He is slowly returning to full on training and racing too.
Guiness

Bartali wrote:
Sat watching telly with yet another cold ... 48.


Better now and out on your bike?
Guiness

SlowRower wrote:
My resting heart rate is generally sub 40 and often goes down to 35/36. Even when I was a lardy slob in my teens, my resting rate was still in the 40s.

I ended up in A&E last summer and got wired up to one of those monitor things. I dosed off to sleep as it was late at night and got woken up by an alarm blaring to the sight of several doctors and nurses charging in my direction. The heart machine had decided that I must be about to die, given how slowly my ticker was going by the standards of the average person in the street, and had called for backup.

I assured them I was fine and that my heart rate was so low because I'm an elite athlete. Smile They accepted that, but for some reason saw fit to do an examination of me that involved grappling my Crown Jewels rather robustly.

I discharged myself from their care as soon as I could...


This is on of the most funniest medical stories to date! So this was the first day you met Mrs SR then? Playing nurses Wink (and elite athletes  Rolling Eyes )
MrsSR

Guiness wrote:
SlowRower wrote:
My resting heart rate is generally sub 40 and often goes down to 35/36. Even when I was a lardy slob in my teens, my resting rate was still in the 40s.

I ended up in A&E last summer and got wired up to one of those monitor things. I dosed off to sleep as it was late at night and got woken up by an alarm blaring to the sight of several doctors and nurses charging in my direction. The heart machine had decided that I must be about to die, given how slowly my ticker was going by the standards of the average person in the street, and had called for backup.

I assured them I was fine and that my heart rate was so low because I'm an elite athlete. Smile They accepted that, but for some reason saw fit to do an examination of me that involved grappling my Crown Jewels rather robustly.

I discharged myself from their care as soon as I could...


This is on of the most funniest medical stories to date! So this was the first day you met Mrs SR then? Playing nurses Wink (and elite athletes  Rolling Eyes )

You have no idea how much I had to pay that nurse. Shame I couldn't afford the rectal exam as well.  Twisted Evil
Guiness

MrsSR wrote:
Guiness wrote:
SlowRower wrote:
My resting heart rate is generally sub 40 and often goes down to 35/36. Even when I was a lardy slob in my teens, my resting rate was still in the 40s.

I ended up in A&E last summer and got wired up to one of those monitor things. I dosed off to sleep as it was late at night and got woken up by an alarm blaring to the sight of several doctors and nurses charging in my direction. The heart machine had decided that I must be about to die, given how slowly my ticker was going by the standards of the average person in the street, and had called for backup.

I assured them I was fine and that my heart rate was so low because I'm an elite athlete. Smile They accepted that, but for some reason saw fit to do an examination of me that involved grappling my Crown Jewels rather robustly.

I discharged myself from their care as soon as I could...


This is on of the most funniest medical stories to date! So this was the first day you met Mrs SR then? Playing nurses Wink (and elite athletes  Rolling Eyes )

You have no idea how much I had to pay that nurse. Shame I couldn't afford the rectal exam as well.  Twisted Evil


Shocked  Very Happy  Laughing

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