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Jackov

numb fingers

Long rides result in some numbness in my fingers. Any advice?
Slapshot

Better mitts, also now, you can get small gel bars that you can put under your tape,

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/ProductDe...08&N=Fizik%20Bar%20Gel%20Pads

Also, move your arms every now and them to allow the blood to circulate properly.
thunderthighs

i get asked many times about numb fingers, and it stems down to riding postion..

on bcgroups i wrote about the dangling chain, try that..

i hope u are a skinny dude, not a buffalo..lol

that gel think, stay away.. ciao
Jackov

thunderthighs wrote:
i get asked many times about numb fingers, and it stems down to riding postion..

on bcgroups i wrote about the dangling chain, try that..

i hope u are a skinny dude, not a buffalo..lol

that gel think, stay away.. ciao


nope, I'm a buffalo
CapeRoadie

Jackov wrote:
thunderthighs wrote:
i get asked many times about numb fingers, and it stems down to riding postion..

on bcgroups i wrote about the dangling chain, try that..

i hope u are a skinny dude, not a buffalo..lol

that gel think, stay away.. ciao


nope, I'm a buffalo


I agree with TT. Position is key. Try letting go of your death grip on the bars, if that's an issue. Try doing scapular protraction and retraction exercises during the ride (you can probably get some Google images of that... I'll try). If you're not used to doing long rides, then you'll develop strength as you do more and it may go away. It may even be thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS or brachial plexus compression by neck, shoulder or chest muscles), but I'd start with fit first.

Have you been professionally fit to your bike?
berck

Humm, never numb fingers. My whole hand some times. Are your handle bars a lot lower than the saddle? Raising the handle bars will put less pressure in the hands. The only extra things I can add.
thunderthighs

not all riders like the "french riding position..
seat higher than handle bars..

i ride level ....

try that..itlain style..

ciao
cyclingtv

Jackov wrote:
thunderthighs wrote:
i get asked many times about numb fingers, and it stems down to riding postion..
on bcgroups i wrote about the dangling chain, try that..
i hope u are a skinny dude, not a buffalo..lol
that gel think, stay away.. ciao
nope, I'm a buffalo
easy.. stop eating like a buffalo Razz become a gazelle.. TT's right.. gel will not cure..
it's a too much weight on your hands problem.. happens to me.. I'm a buffalo+ Embarassed
notice when riding quite hard = less weight on my hands = get less numbness.. Wink
Dr.Wierd

I've found that if I make sure that my elbows aren't locked, and not use my arms to hold myself up, my hands are less prone to numb up, if at all.
Bartali

Agree with most of the above. Specialised do a glove with extra padding 'protecting' the ulner nerve. Might help, but the real issue is position. Work on your core stability and get that weight off the bars. Bent elbows will help.
chasm

Re: numb fingers

Jackov wrote:
Long rides result in some numbness in my fingers. Any advice?


I agree with TT et al about riding position being important. I'd also suggest doing some work on your core muscles. As you get tired, if your core isn't in great shape, you'll tend to slump and put more and more weight on your hands.
CapeRoadie

I wouldn't waste too much time on "core" muscles for this problem. For everything else, fine. I'd be looking at thoracic extensor muscles, pectoral muscle stretching, scapular stabilization exercises (retraction-protraction on an unstable surface), posture on the bike (no rounding of upper back), and neck flexibility. I'd also rule out a circulatory problem, and other forms of brachial nerve compression (a.k.a. thoracic outlet syndrome) besides pectoralis minor compression of the brachial plexus. And make sure there aren't any cervical disc problems. Google that.
thunderthighs

tall athlete can benefit fro FRENCH POSITION, BECUZE LVERS ARE LONG, ARMS TOO,but compact like me i ride were my seat is slightly higher than my handlebars.

sarroni adn me are identical in size, becuz when he came to ride queens park in mid 80s, i asked could swap bikes will riding.. he agreed, my dad is feinds with his coach.. wow..perfect fit.. ciao
cardinal guzman

If the roads are very 'textured' you could take 20psi from yer front tyre and/or ditch the carbon forks.
sheeponabike

I thought carbon forks were supposed to iron out road "noise"?
CapeRoadie

sheeponabike wrote:
I thought carbon forks were supposed to iron out road "noise"?


They do, but nearly as much as the softer ride afforded by deflating the tires a tad.
headwind

Ive given this a lot of thought over the years, as I suffered from right hand numbness. for me, position changes didnt do much. I wnet through lots of differnt things until the right gloves soved the problem.. Most gloves seem to fail to really protect the nerve bundle coming from the wrist and that bothered my bone/nerve geometry. but with complete padding across the hand, the numbness disappeared PDQ. Im using Louis Garneau ergo air gloves.

death gripping is a disaster too.

hw
cardinal guzman

sheeponabike wrote:
I thought carbon forks were supposed to iron out road "noise"?


Hi Sheep,

you could be right. I always thought that carbon fibre transferred energy more efficiently than steel or Ti?
Dr.Wierd

CapeRoadie wrote:
I wouldn't waste too much time on "core" muscles for this problem. For everything else, fine. I'd be looking at thoracic extensor muscles, pectoral muscle stretching, scapular stabilization exercises (retraction-protraction on an unstable surface), posture on the bike (no rounding of upper back), and neck flexibility. I'd also rule out a circulatory problem, and other forms of brachial nerve compression (a.k.a. thoracic outlet syndrome) besides pectoralis minor compression of the brachial plexus. And make sure there aren't any cervical disc problems. Google that.


Those are core exercises
Jackov

Thanks for the thoughts.

I've loosened my grip, and changed the where the pressure bear on my fingers. It's made some difference.
CapeRoadie

Dr.Wierd wrote:
CapeRoadie wrote:
I wouldn't waste too much time on "core" muscles for this problem. For everything else, fine. I'd be looking at thoracic extensor muscles, pectoral muscle stretching, scapular stabilization exercises (retraction-protraction on an unstable surface), posture on the bike (no rounding of upper back), and neck flexibility. I'd also rule out a circulatory problem, and other forms of brachial nerve compression (a.k.a. thoracic outlet syndrome) besides pectoralis minor compression of the brachial plexus. And make sure there aren't any cervical disc problems. Google that.


Those are core exercises


No. Core exercises are exercises for lumbar spine musculature:

transverse abdominus
rectus abdominus
quadratus lumborum
oblique abdominals
lumbar multifidi
iliopsoas (i.e., hip flexors)
erector spinae
pelvic floor muscles
thunderthighs

learn to ride a friggen bike, then lose some of that baby fat, get a life, ciao
Dr.Wierd

CapeRoadie wrote:
Dr.Wierd wrote:
CapeRoadie wrote:
I wouldn't waste too much time on "core" muscles for this problem. For everything else, fine. I'd be looking at thoracic extensor muscles, pectoral muscle stretching, scapular stabilization exercises (retraction-protraction on an unstable surface), posture on the bike (no rounding of upper back), and neck flexibility. I'd also rule out a circulatory problem, and other forms of brachial nerve compression (a.k.a. thoracic outlet syndrome) besides pectoralis minor compression of the brachial plexus. And make sure there aren't any cervical disc problems. Google that.


Those are core exercises


No. Core exercises are exercises for lumbar spine musculature:

transverse abdominus
rectus abdominus
quadratus lumborum
oblique abdominals
lumbar multifidi
iliopsoas (i.e., hip flexors)
erector spinae
pelvic floor muscles


In your eyes
berck

Core exercise info

http://www.spine-health.com/topics/conserv/rehab/ball/ball04.html
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/core-strength/SM00047
http://sportsmedicine.about.com/o...l_Exercises_and_Core_Strength.htm
MerlinGuy

CapeRoadie wrote:

transverse abdominus
rectus abdominus
quadratus lumborum
oblique abdominals
lumbar multifidi
iliopsoas (i.e., hip flexors)
erector spinae
pelvic floor muscles


All good cuts but in my mind you need to match the cut to the meal AND pair with a good wine.
Bartali

You Cannibal you.
CapeRoadie

EDDY RETURNS! MG, that was a new twist.
cardinal guzman

Going back to the carbon thing......

Does anyone have access to any technical papers with regard to the resonant qualities of carbon/Ti/Aluminum/Steel?

When I meet people on a carbon bike, their steed is always singing like a tenor, whilst my steel alloy one is virtually silent (unless the indexing needs tightening a notch). Some carbon bikes, if you put strings on them, you could play them like a Ukelele! This leads me to believe you are transferring miles more energy up through your hands and bum on a carbon bike.

I'll be happy to be proved wrong, but doubt I will be.
CapeRoadie

Carbon is very forgiving imho.  Me likes it a lot.
chasm

cardinal guzman wrote:
Going back to the carbon thing......

Does anyone have access to any technical papers with regard to the resonant qualities of carbon/Ti/Aluminum/Steel?

When I meet people on a carbon bike, their steed is always singing like a tenor, whilst my steel alloy one is virtually silent (unless the indexing needs tightening a notch). Some carbon bikes, if you put strings on them, you could play them like a Ukelele! This leads me to believe you are transferring miles more energy up through your hands and bum on a carbon bike.

I'll be happy to be proved wrong, but doubt I will be.


I don't have the technical data, but I do have both steel and carbon bikes. What I don't have is aluminium.

Aluminium is probably the most rigid of the three, judging by the feel. Does this make it faster? I doubt it, because over long distances the vibrations it fails to absorb get absorbed by the rider, which is fatiguing. Steel is great - durable, gives a comfortable ride, less prone to disastrous failure in a crash. Carbon is, however, even more comfortable, and lighter, and your final sentence is mistaken. It's the frame, not your hands and bum, that is absorbing the vibration if you're on a good carbon bike.
cardinal guzman

[quote="chasm"]
cardinal guzman wrote:
It's the frame, not your hands and bum, that is absorbing the vibration if you're on a good carbon bike.


I know that's what's said about carbon - I just don't believe it. That stuff resonates.
chasm

[quote="cardinal guzman"]
chasm wrote:
cardinal guzman wrote:
It's the frame, not your hands and bum, that is absorbing the vibration if you're on a good carbon bike.


I know that's what's said about carbon - I just don't believe it. That stuff resonates.


You aren't following my argument. But feeling is believing. Why don't you just try it?
cardinal guzman

chasm wrote:

You aren't following my argument. But feeling is believing. Why don't you just try it?


I honestly am following your argument, but would like to see some technical papers because I reckon carbon simply changes the nature of the vibration. I cannot try it for ethical reasons, but I'm not an evangelist so I'll leave that there.
forza_petacchi

Ethical reasons?
cardinal guzman

forza_petacchi wrote:
Ethical reasons?


Not so much ethical, but I don't know of an appropriate word.

Carbon fibres are virtually indestructable. I live in the world centre for asbestosis. The incredibly popularity and versatility of this latest wonder-fibre gives me the chills. (I wouldn't have told you if you hadn't asked Smile )
berck

cardinal guzman wrote:

Does anyone have access to any technical papers with regard to the resonant qualities of carbon/Ti/Aluminum/Steel?


Well, its not necessarily a technical paper, but its a place to start. Try this link
forza_petacchi

cardinal guzman wrote:
forza_petacchi wrote:
Ethical reasons?


Not so much ethical, but I don't know of an appropriate word.

Carbon fibres are virtually indestructable. I live in the world centre for asbestosis. The incredibly popularity and versatility of this latest wonder-fibre gives me the chills. (I wouldn't have told you if you hadn't asked Smile )
I thought that was only carbon nanotubes....I'm pretty sure I could smash the crap out of my carbon fork, seatstays, and seatpost if I wanted too (needless to say, I don't).
chasm

forza_petacchi wrote:
cardinal guzman wrote:
forza_petacchi wrote:
Ethical reasons?


Not so much ethical, but I don't know of an appropriate word.

Carbon fibres are virtually indestructable. I live in the world centre for asbestosis. The incredibly popularity and versatility of this latest wonder-fibre gives me the chills. (I wouldn't have told you if you hadn't asked Smile )
I thought that was only carbon nanotubes....I'm pretty sure I could smash the crap out of my carbon fork, seatstays, and seatpost if I wanted too (needless to say, I don't).


it is only carbon nanotubes, but I think that is CG's point. Carbon nanotubes are finer than asbestos fibres, and while I hadn't though about it before, I now find that there are some fears about them proving to be at least as potentially injurious to health.

http://occmed.oxfordjournals.org/...mp;issue=5&resourcetype=HWCIT

So I guess how we recycle our carbon bikes, and other gizmos made of the same material, will become an issue. Safe enough while woven and glued together with resin, though.
CapeRoadie

My advice is to ride your carbon fibre bike out-of-doors, to breathe in the clean country air deeply whilst out riding, and to avoid living inside the closed quarters of the carbon tubing itself.  Also, do not lick, lap, taste or otherwise sample the carbon flavour.  Ethically, that would be about right.
cardinal guzman

Whilst I am certainly more worried about nano tubes. I am still worried about carbon fibres.

If, for instance you do smash up your carbon bike Forza. Do you know what will happen to the particles of carbon fibre released into the air if you breathe them in or they are absorbed into your skin? Has this even ben tested? If it was, was it tested by industry experts like the ones who said asbestos was safe for 50 years?

Ethically Cape, it matters not what you do on your carbon bike, just that when you've finished with it, you make sure it goes straight to a carbon recycling company (this is an easy thing to ensure) and not to a landfill site in China or Chad (this is more likely in most cases).

I'm not harping on here, just making sure my position is clear. Very Happy
MAILLOT JAUNE

+1 cg.

Even when they found that asbestos was dangerous, a lot of companies still continued to expose their workers to it without providing suitable personal protective equipment.
chasm

cardinal guzman wrote:
Whilst I am certainly more worried about nano tubes. I am still worried about carbon fibres.


Don't be. If you look at the link, it is the size, more than the substance, of the material that seems to be significant in terms of cell damage. So as long as the little suckers are stuck together in nice big fibres, there's no particular reason to suppose that they'll do much damage. The issue, I guess, as you suggest, is how the material gets recycled.

I'm pretty confident that riding my carbon fibre bike is better for my health, and yours, than breathing the particularates emitted by my car, anyway.
cardinal guzman

MAILLOT JAUNE wrote:
+1 cg.

Even when they found that asbestos was dangerous, a lot of companies still continued to expose their workers to it without providing suitable personal protective equipment.


It's buried in unmarked landfill time bombs, all round here from Bury to Halifax. Turner Brothers Asbestos on the West side of the Pennines and Cape Asbestos here (named after the tip of South Africa where the stuff came from, not the good doctor on this forum Smile ).

Funnily enough, a wind sweeps across Capetown at christmas that is called 'The Cape Doctor' - boring but true!
CapeRoadie

cardinal guzman wrote:
...Ethically Cape, it matters not what you do on your carbon bike, just that when you've finished with it, you make sure it goes straight to a carbon recycling company (this is an easy thing to ensure) and not to a landfill site in China or Chad (this is more likely in most cases).

I'm not harping on here, just making sure my position is clear. Very Happy


I hear you, CG.  Hopefully they will be ridden by somebody forever.

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