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Slapshot

Full Carbon Fibre Bikes

I am looking to get a new bike next year, I have to decide between this two,


Full Carbon Fibre
http://www.spiuk.com/home/productos-ficha-ing.asp?id=155

or

http://www.spiuk.com/home/productos-ficha-ing.asp?id=153

I have been talking to some people that bought full carbon fibre bikes and they are not happy at all.

Any of you have a bad experience with full carbon fibre???

BTW, I have to choose between those two cos is a friendīs company...
headwind

Re: Full Carbon Fibre Bikes

bergaretxebe wrote:
I am looking to get a new bike next year, I have to decide between this two,


Full Carbon Fibre
http://www.spiuk.com/home/productos-ficha-ing.asp?id=155

or

http://www.spiuk.com/home/productos-ficha-ing.asp?id=153

I have been talking to some people that bought full carbon fibre bikes and they are not happy at all.

Any of you have a bad experience with full carbon fibre???

BTW, I have to choose between those two cos is a friendīs company...


HI Bergar, Ive been on a full carbon frame for almost 4 years now (with 1.5 off in between).

Ive had bad experiences, but they have been balanced by the good. Heres my perspective.

Bad:
careful in the crashes! To me thats been the biggest issue. There is a lurking fear you can lose the frame even in a low speed dump.

clamping issues. watch those tolerances when clamping things. If it says 5 Nm max...thats what it means. In my experience, the biggest issue is seat post clamping force. Without a naturally high friction surface, the chance for post slip is real and annoying. Also, overclamping can lead to issues with the carbon. I changed this on my second frame, which has an integrated seat post "mast" and my saddle rests right on top with no vertical adjustment (well very little anyway).

paranoia? I look for stress cracks all the time. The good news is, I do moderate diasssembly often and it leads to a much cleaner bike!

Good:

ride. Ive had 2 carbon frames with different "feels", but both are much more friendly on the body than my Al or Al-C bikes. Its the raison d'etre for carbon. In my eyes, this is the call to carbon.

mass. everyone makes a deal about the weight. no doubt they are light, but thats never been a major part of my decision making, yet a bene nonetheless.

sex appeal. I dont care what paint you put on a bike...carbon weave is HOT!!

enjoy that spiuk!

hw
CapeRoadie

Titanium.
cosmo

Re: Full Carbon Fibre Bikes

bergaretxebe wrote:
I am looking to get a new bike next year, I have to decide between this two,


Full Carbon Fibre
http://www.spiuk.com/home/productos-ficha-ing.asp?id=155

or

http://www.spiuk.com/home/productos-ficha-ing.asp?id=153

I have been talking to some people that bought full carbon fibre bikes and they are not happy at all.

Any of you have a bad experience with full carbon fibre???

BTW, I have to choose between those two cos is a friendīs company...



Too fragile for my liking, unless you've plenty of money? As headwind says, be careful with crashes, you only need one and the bike and components could be wrote off. They're all right for Pros as they don't have to buy their own bikes. For me the only good aspect is the reduction in weight when travelling by air.
headwind

Ill disagree on 2 points cosmo. Unlikely to lose components. I dont see any difference between crashing an Al bike or a C bike. Believe me, I speak from experience. Also, the ride on a C frame is dramatically different from Al or Al-C hybrids. Since switching to a C frame Ive greatly reduced lower back fatigue and hand/foot numbness. When I ride on my all Al Klein, its a rude awakening.

hw
cosmo

headwind wrote:
Ill disagree on 2 points cosmo. Unlikely to lose components. I dont see any difference between crashing an Al bike or a C bike. Believe me, I speak from experience. Also, the ride on a C frame is dramatically different from Al or Al-C hybrids. Since switching to a C frame Ive greatly reduced lower back fatigue and hand/foot numbness. When I ride on my all Al Klein, its a rude awakening.

hw


A crash on a Carbon bike is more likely to result in catastrophic failure than on an Aluminium bike. I know of two people who have totally wrote carbon wheels off and I've snapped a seat post before.

Yes, Carbon does offer a more forgiving ride but, if you don't suffer from lower back fatigue and hand/foot numbness...............

I think the best advice for bergaretxebe is to try both bikes, weigh up the pros and cons decide for himself.
Slapshot

he he he!!!

Lucky me I can do that.

I just need to go to their workshop in SPAIN!!!! I will have to wait until christmas.
headwind

cosmo wrote:
headwind wrote:
Ill disagree on 2 points cosmo. Unlikely to lose components. I dont see any difference between crashing an Al bike or a C bike. Believe me, I speak from experience. Also, the ride on a C frame is dramatically different from Al or Al-C hybrids. Since switching to a C frame Ive greatly reduced lower back fatigue and hand/foot numbness. When I ride on my all Al Klein, its a rude awakening.

hw


A crash on a Carbon bike is more likely to result in catastrophic failure than on an Aluminium bike. I know of two people who have totally wrote carbon wheels off and I've snapped a seat post before.

Yes, Carbon does offer a more forgiving ride but, if you don't suffer from lower back fatigue and hand/foot numbness...............

I think the best advice for bergaretxebe is to try both bikes, weigh up the pros and cons decide for himself.


I wasnt talking carbon hoops. Not sure how a carbon frame wreck is linked to C wheel breaking. Ive thought about going with Zipps, but as noted in the hubs thread...Im going with 32h R and 28h F Alu rims for my climbing wheel.

hw
mowcopmick

For what it's worth I got one of these newfangle carbon bikes in the spring - it's great - comfy, light, rides well. I'm thoughtful of the alegations about catastophic failure caused by scratches and cracks etc but i reckon these frames are pretty durable - and as durable or more durable than steel, titanium and anything else.

The mechanics in my local bike shop told me candidly that the only general problem they are aware of is the alloy b/b shell becoming unbonded from the carbon. But that was on Trek frames and they seem to have fixed it. This is a very busy specialist bike shop!!

Carbon technology in still improving and becoming even cheaper so I would say it's the wise choice these days. I reckon you'll see carbon bikes in Halfords soon.

By the way, the way to stop the seatpin slipping is not to overtighten the clamp. Put some hair-spray on the pin before fitting it to the frame. Works for all 'slippery clampings' - old pro trick.
headwind

mowcopmick wrote:
For what it's worth I got one of these newfangle carbon bikes in the spring - it's great - comfy, light, rides well. I'm thoughtful of the alegations about catastophic failure caused by scratches and cracks etc but i reckon these frames are pretty durable - and as durable or more durable than steel, titanium and anything else.

The mechanics in my local bike shop told me candidly that the only general problem they are aware of is the alloy b/b shell becoming unbonded from the carbon. But that was on Trek frames and they seem to have fixed it. This is a very busy specialist bike shop!!

Carbon technology in still improving and becoming even cheaper so I would say it's the wise choice these days. I reckon you'll see carbon bikes in Halfords soon.

By the way, the way to stop the seatpin slipping is not to overtighten the clamp. Put some hair-spray on the pin before fitting it to the frame. Works for all 'slippery clampings' - old pro trick.


love the hair spray trick. i see that a new "lube" has come out filled with little tiny compressible balls that increas friction...hair spray seems much more reasonable.

My miles on my Al bikes have seriously tailed off with a carbon frame to ride. Just super smooth ride thats hard to beat.

hw
Clayton Seymour

Anyone know why Danilo Di Luca still prefers an aluminium frame? Obviously, not a cost based decision. I looked on his web site and all I could find was the spec for the Cannondale frame he'll be riding next year - no reasoning behind his choice of aluminium.
bbnaz

Probably just likes it. I know that Sean Kelly said he liked his toe cages and only made the switch to clipless at the end of his career because the team had a contract with the pedal supplier. He didn't think they were exponentially better.
headwind

I read somewhere that he and Mags choose Al for the stiffness.

hw
T-rek

Specifically the stiffness in the bottom bracket.
bianchirider

Mags rides alu because a carbon frame wouldnt last too long with his power and weight.
I think it has a lot to do with flex.
I ride a bianchi and have a bit to do the distributor and thats what he tells me.
cosmo

bianchirider wrote:
Mags rides alu because a carbon frame wouldnt last too long with his power and weight.
I think it has a lot to do with flex.
I ride a bianchi and have a bit to do the distributor and thats what he tells me.



Carbon is for weight reduction & comfort at the expense of strength. As I'm well over 6 foot, I too would be reluctant to go for carbon.

Bergaretxebe, have you made up your mind yet?
mowcopmick

cosmo wrote:
bianchirider wrote:
Mags rides alu because a carbon frame wouldnt last too long with his power and weight.
I think it has a lot to do with flex.
I ride a bianchi and have a bit to do the distributor and thats what he tells me.



Carbon is for weight reduction & comfort at the expense of strength. As I'm well over 6 foot, I too would be reluctant to go for carbon.

Bergaretxebe, have you made up your mind yet?


Not so sure about that; and what exactly do you mean by strength? A bit of flex is OK and it's not going to snap. I'm no lightweight either and my carbon has been OK in road races around the notoriously bumpy Cheshire roads. I suppose you can't have soft and flexi as well as stiffness and rigidity - as the actress said to the bishop.
CapeRoadie

mowcopmick wrote:
cosmo wrote:
bianchirider wrote:
Mags rides alu because a carbon frame wouldnt last too long with his power and weight.
I think it has a lot to do with flex.
I ride a bianchi and have a bit to do the distributor and thats what he tells me.



Carbon is for weight reduction & comfort at the expense of strength. As I'm well over 6 foot, I too would be reluctant to go for carbon.

Bergaretxebe, have you made up your mind yet?


Not so sure about that; and what exactly do you mean by strength? A bit of flex is OK and it's not going to snap. I'm no lightweight either and my carbon has been OK in road races around the notoriously bumpy Cheshire roads. I suppose you can't have soft and flexi as well as stiffness and rigidity - as the actress said to the bishop.


Laughing
paperman

Anyone heard of or ride tifosi frames? Can't find much about them except for the company website. Just moved to new town and the local bike shop stocks them. Of course the dealer said they're great. Everyone loves em!! Twisted Evil Cool I'm told. Confused .

You choose your bike yet Berg?
crash48

I think Skinnywheels stocks them-well they did.

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